Is there a surgery other than shoulder replacement that can relieve the pain?

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Age 79 male, using primidone tamulosin hydroxyzine, paroxatine, clopidigrel, metformin, propranolol, atorvastatin, pentaprozole, and voltaren cream for shoulder pain.

2 Answers

These messages are for mutual support and information sharing only. Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.

What causes your shoulder pain in the first place? There are too many causes for the shoulder pain:

  • Rotator cuff impingement. A rotator cuff impingement happens when there is irritation, inflammation, or compression of the tendons or bursa (the fluid-filled sac that sits between bones) in the shoulder. An impingement can be caused by an injury, but it can also just result from general wear and tear from daily life.
  • Rotator cuff tears. A tear in the rotator cuff will produce pain that is similar to an impingement but has one additional differentiating feature. A tear can be partial, whereby only part of the tendon is ripped away from the bone it is attached to. Or there can be a full tear, causing the tendon to completely separate from the bone. If you suspect a tear or are experiencing sudden pain from an injury, see a doctor right away, because you may need surgery to fix the problem. But if you aren't experiencing weakness and the pain is not severe, rest and anti-inflammatory medications may be enough to ease your discomfort.
  • Calcific tendinitis. Pain from calcific tendinitis comes from calcium deposits embedded within the rotator cuff tendons. While it's unclear exactly what causes these deposits to form, some experts believe they may result from a healing process in the ligament gone awry. The condition causes sudden, severe pain that often starts in the morning. It's more common in middle-aged and older adults and those who have diabetes. Treatment is aimed at relieving pain and preserving range of motion of the shoulder. Options include anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. If the pain is severe or persistent, your doctor may suggest surgery to remove the deposits.
  • Adhesive capsulitis. Commonly referred to as frozen shoulder, adhesive capsulitis is caused by a thickening and stiffening of the tissues around the shoulder joint. It's typically develops in people ages 40 to 60. Frozen shoulder is more common in women than in men and in people with certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, or thyroid disorders.
  • Osteoarthritis. The condition develops when cartilage cushions between the bones in the shoulder erode, causing the bones to rub against one another. There are numerous treatments for osteoarthritis, including rest, modifications to activities, anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, and surgery in some cases.There are other ways that you can control the pain without a surgery, such as steroid injections. Injecting corticosteroids into your shoulder joint may help decrease pain and improve shoulder mobility, especially in the early stages of the process.
First, identify what causes your shoulder pain. Shoulder replacement should only be considered if your shoulder has degenerative or other irreversible symptoms. Medication can only relieve your pain for a short time.
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