What Should I Pay More Attention Against DVT During Pregnancy?

4 Answers

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Dr. just informed me I'm pregnant, yeah! I'm trilled, and a bit nervous. My mom had DVT, I heard that women at pregnancy has a high risk of DVT, is that true? What shall I do? I'm a bit over weight, 5 feet 5 inches, 169 pounds. What shall I do to prevent it? People say when you get DVT you could die.
Hi, Elina, I'm sorry to say that, but yes, it is very common for pregnancy women to get DVT.
How common is it?
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which encompasses both deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, occurs in about one in every 1,000 pregnancies. While those numbers make it a relatively uncommon complication, VTE crops up five to 10 times more frequently in expecting women than in other women of the same age — and 20 times more frequently in the six weeks after birth.
What’s worse, being overweight increases your risk of getting DVT.
The good news is that you won’t die because DVT and PE are treatable and even preventable among women who are most at risk.
Here are some suggestions for you to prevent DVT:
Getting plenty of pregnancy-safe exercise (as long as you have the OK from your practitioner).
Walking and stretching if you've been sitting for more than two to three hours (for example, if you’re on a flight).
Moving your legs while you’re sitting (raise and lower your heels and then your toes).
If you’re at high risk, wearing support hose to prevent clots from developing in your legs. You may also be asked to take a preventative dose of heparin, sometimes during the whole pregnancy or just for six to eight weeks after birth. You should consult your doctor before taking any actions.
DVT can cause Pulmonary embolism,which is fetal. YOU should not worry about this a lot. your mother is old, maybe have Varicose veins。

do exercise, try to  walk for 30 mins or longer everyday.
Hi, Elina, I'm sorry to say that, but yes, it is very common for pregnancy women to get DVT.
How common is it?
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which encompasses both deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, occurs in about one in every 1,000 pregnancies. While those numbers make it a relatively uncommon complication, VTE crops up five to 10 times more frequently in expecting women than in other women of the same age — and 20 times more frequently in the six weeks after birth.
What’s worse, being overweight increases your risk of getting DVT.
The good news is that you won’t die because DVT and PE are treatable and even preventable among women who are most at risk.
Here are some suggestions for you to prevent DVT:
Getting plenty of pregnancy-safe exercise (as long as you have the OK from your practitioner).
Walking and stretching if you've been sitting for more than two to three hours (for example, if you’re on a flight).
Moving your legs while you’re sitting (raise and lower your heels and then your toes).
If you’re at high risk, wearing support hose to prevent clots from developing in your legs. You may also be asked to take a preventative dose of heparin, sometimes during the whole pregnancy or just for six to eight weeks after birth. You should consult your doctor before taking any actions.
Hi, sir, I’m prepare for a baby too. Could you tell me why pregnancy women are more vulnerable to DVT?
Hi Doctor, my aunt is pregnant too. How could we know if she will suffer from DVT? Or what are the early signs of DVT?
Hi, sir, I’m prepare for a baby too. Could you tell me why pregnancy women are more vulnerable to DVT?
Hello, Luz, according to some studies, during pregnancy, the level of blood-clotting proteins increases while anti-clotting protein levels get lower. Other factors that can contribute are the enlarged uterus, which increases pressure on the veins that return the blood to the heart from the lower body.
Hi Doctor, my aunt is pregnant too. How could we know if she will suffer from DVT? Or what are the early signs of DVT?
One of the simplest ways to tell whether she might have DVT or not is to find out if she feels painful and swelling in just one leg, because the most common symptoms of a deep vein thrombosis usually occur in just one leg and the patient may experience a heavy or painful feeling in the leg (a lot of people say that it feels like a really bad pulled muscle that doesn’t go away), tenderness and/or warmth in the calf or thigh, and slight to severe swelling.
If left untreated, a clot moves into the lungs and blocks the blood supply. It can cause trouble breathing, low blood pressure, fainting, a faster heart rate, chest pain, and coughing up blood. If she has any of these, call 911 and get medical care right away.
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