I had whooping cough as a child, am i immune? I'm 65 now.

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The population is generally susceptible, but the incidence of infant is the highest. Mothers do not have enough protective antibodies to pass on to the fetus, so infants under 6 months have more morbidity. Persistent immunity can be acquired after illness, and the second case is rare.
Before the vaccine was used, the main infected poputation of whooping cough was children and adolescents aged 1-9 years. Adults and small infants were less common. At that time, whooping cough was generally considered to be a lifelong-immunity disease after infection. Therefore, before the vaccine is used, most people have been infected with whooping cough before adulthood. The natural infection produces long-lasting immunity, so adults rarely get sick.
Yes, once you had it, you get the life-long immune.
I had measles 60 years ago with all my siblings.can I get it now
No. You seem to be immune against measles. If you have written documentation showing at least one of the following, you are considered immune against measles by CDC:

1. You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n)—
*school-aged child (grades K-12)
*adult who will be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.
2. You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n)—
*preschool-aged child
*adult who will not be in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.
3. A laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life.
4. A laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles.
5. You were born before 1957.
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