Is AFib Serious?

2 Answers

These messages are for mutual support and information sharing only. Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.
http://healthtopquestions.com/?p=1297 Undoubtedly, atria fibrillation patients who show severe symptoms should take it seriously, for it damages your heart, which is the center of organs, and may even threaten your life. The blood that remains in the atria can pool and create blood clots, which get spawned to the rest of the body. When a clot dwells in your brain, you will have a stroke. You won’t die from a stroke, but sometimes permanent disability is inevitable. Furthermore, AFib can overwork your heart, when the heart gets exhausted after a long time of stress, you may die from heart failure. For people with subtle symptoms, they can’t ignore the importance of treatment. You may think it’s not serious now. But it’s only for now. If you don’t treat it carefully, you will put yourself in danger, for it will get worse as you age.   Related FAQs: http://healthtopquestions.com/what-are-complications-from-atrial-fibrillation/   http://healthtopquestions.com/?p=86 http://healthtopquestions.com/?p=1297

Usually not, but can be.  You have to check with a doctor to know.  In the mean time, you might want to try this:  

After 9 years of trying different foods and logging EVERYTHING I ate, I found sugar (and to a lesser degree, salt – i.e. dehydration) was triggering my Afib. Doctors don't want to hear this - there is no money in telling patients to eat less sugar. Each person has a different sugar threshold - and it changes as you get older, so you need to count every gram of sugar you eat every day (including natural sugars in fruits, etc.). My tolerance level was 190 grams of sugar per day 8 years ago, 85 grams a year and a half ago, and 60 grams today, so AFIB episodes are more frequent and last longer. If you keep your intake of sugar below your threshold level your AFIB will not happen again (easier said than done of course). It's not the food - it's the sugar (or salt - see below) IN the food that's causing your problems. Try it and you will see - should only take you 1 or 2 months of trial-and-error to find your threshold level. And for the record - ALL sugars are treated the same (honey, refined, agave, natural sugars in fruits, etc.). I successfully triggered AFIB by eating a bunch of plums and peaches one day just to test it out. In addition, I have noticed that moderate exercise (7-mile bike ride or 5-mile hike in the park) often puts my Afib heart back in to normal rhythm a couple hours later. Don’t know why – perhaps you burn off the excess sugars in your blood/muscles or sweat out excess salt??

Also, in addition to sugar, if you are dehydrated - this will trigger AFIB as well. It seems (but I have no proof of this) that a little uptick of salt in your blood is being treated the same as an uptick of sugar - both cause AFIB episodes. (I’m not a doctor – it may be the sugar in your muscles/organs and not in your blood, don’t know). In any case you have to keep hydrated, and not eat too much salt. The root problem is that our bodies are not processing sugar/salt properly and no doctor knows why, but the AFIB seems to be a symptom of this and not the primary problem, but medicine is not advanced enough to know the core reason that causes AFIB at this time. You can have a healthy heart and still have Afib – something inside us is triggering it when we eat too much sugar or get (even a little) dehydrated. Find out the core reason for this and you will be a millionaire and make the cover of Time Magazine! Good luck

 

       

PS – there is a study backing up this data you can view at: 

Cardiab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2840-7-28

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