How does one help/assist one with PTSD?

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related to an answer for: What Does Clinical Depression Mean?

2 Answers

These messages are for mutual support and information sharing only. Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.
  • Learn about PTSD. This can help you understand what your loved one is going through.
  • Recognize that avoidance and withdrawal are part of the disorder. If your loved one resists your help, allow space and let your loved one know that you're available when he or she is ready to accept your help.
  • Offer to attend medical appointments. If your loved one is willing, attending appointments can help you understand and assist with treatment.
  • Be willing to listen. Let your loved one know you're willing to listen, but you understand if he or she doesn't want to talk. Try not to force your loved one to talk about the trauma until he or she is ready.
  • Encourage participation. Plan opportunities for activities with family and friends. Celebrate good events.
  • Make your own health a priority. Take care of yourself by eating healthy, being physically active and getting enough rest. Take time alone or with friends, doing activities that help you recharge.
  • Seek help if you need it. If you have difficulty coping, talk with your doctor. He or she may refer you to a therapist who can help you work through your stress.
  • Stay safe. Plan a safe place for yourself and your children if your loved one becomes violent or abusive.
I found this from Mayoclinic.org, hope it helps.
My husband was diagnosed with avoidant ptsd after returning from over seas. He is open with me, but not about his experiences. And I don't expect to understand what he went through...I am just there to listen and support him any way I can. I'm going with him the next time to see the doctor so I can ask some questions.
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