Why on Earth Should I Protect My Bald Head from Sun Damage?

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Still thinking sunscreen, umbrellas and sun hats are for ladies? You definitely should take care of your bald head with just the same equipment.

    

Not only should you apply sunscreen, but you need to reapply it every several hours outdoor. If you think applying once is enough, think about your head pointing directly up to the sun and being ready to get a potential skin disaster.

   

   

Are these three reasons enough to convince you?

 

Exposed to the sun for a long time can lead to skin cancer

   

Your head is even more easily to get skin cancer than your face. Compared with sitting there all day with your sunglasses on, getting an umbrella and applying sunscreen are more recommended.

       

If you feel dry, rough, and scaly patches on your scalp, it means you may have actinic keratosis, the red and pink, scaly splotches which is considered to the very earliest stage of skin cancer. They are not enough to be treated seriously at first because most bald men don’t know how important treating actinic keratosis in time is.

   

   

“Over time it can progress to be a more significant issue, and if left untreated can develop into squamous cell carcinoma [a skin cancer],” Dr. Joel Schlessinger said.

   

Men should inspect their scalp every month to see if there is any suspicious areas, which should then be evaluated and possibly even biopsied.

   

The doctor also emphasized the importance of men applying enough sunscreen before going outdoors and reapplying every two hours.

  

       

    

The sun burns your skin

         

Let’s do a simple test first: which skin is thicker, the skin on your face or on the top of your head?

     

The answer is the skin on your face. Surprised?

    

The skin on the top is stretched over your head, which makes it thinner and more susceptible to burning.

    

Although you may have heard that exposed under sunshine can give you Vitamin D, but that’s not like that when you stay out for more than 30 minutes. Usually hair can help protect your head from the sun’s rays, but with your scalp exposed, it may be easier to be damaged than your facial skin.

    

    

         

Things to do to protect your bald head

    

Avoid repeated long-term sun exposure

    

Avoid being exposed to sunshine directly for a long time, and minimize the frequency of long-term exposures when you can’t avoid them (eg. when you go for a professional beach volleyball game).

    

     

Wear sunblock

     

Sunblock is certainly not just for ladies, and it’s not just for summers, either.

     

If you have thinning hair or a bald head, it’s important to wear sunblock all year round. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, men are at a much higher risk of developing skin cancer compared to women.

    

Applying sunscreen to your scalp every day can significantly reduce your risk of developing deadly skin cancers. Sunscreen can also help your scalp looking youthful and healthy.

    

    

Wear a hat

   

Wearing a baseball hat is better than sitting in the shade where the UVR (ultraviolet radiation) still reach your skin, just at a lower level. It can also help when you forget to apply your sunblock.

    

For those who have thinning hair, wearing a hat is also a good choice for applying sunscreen to your scalp may look like a greased up hamburger flipper.

    

Of course, if you are not keeping a bald head because it looks cool, you can also try to use some products against hair loss.

    

    

How much sunscreen to put on your head

     

The dose used on your scalp is like your face. You can use the size of a one-dollar coin of sunscreen for each. And don’t forget to apply it to your ears, necks and other exposed skin. An adult may need an ounce of sunscreen to cover the whole body.

   

1 Answer

Do low SPF sunscreens work??
It also works, just not as useful as high SPF. sunscreen with SPF 30+ is pretty common in pharmacies, malls or online, so you won't miss it.
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